Trouble For The Leading Lady by Rachel Brimble

Trouble for the Leading Lady Cover

Bath, 1852.

As a girl, Nancy Bloom would go to Bath’s Theatre Royal, sit on the hard wooden benches and stare in awe at the actresses playing men as much as the women dressed in finery. She longed to be a part of it all and when a man promised her parents he could find a role for Nancy in the theatre, they believed him.

His lie and betrayal led to her ruin.

Francis Carlyle is a theatre manager, an ambitious man always looking for the next big thing to take the country by storm. A self-made man, Francis has finally shed the skin of his painful past and is now rich, successful and in need of a new female star. Never in a million years did he think he’d find her standing on a table in one of Bath’s bawdiest pubs.

Nancy vowed never to trust a man again. Francis will do anything to make her his star. As they engage in a battle of wits and wills, can either survive with their hearts intact?

The second in Rachel Brimble’s thrilling new Victorian saga series, Trouble for the Leading Lady will whisk you away to the riotous, thriving underbelly of Victorian Bath.

⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️

A strange but gripping story
Nancy is a prostitute who has drama of being a star. Francis is the manager of the Theatre Royal in Bath and sees Nancy as the star of the play he is writing
I liked Nancy, she portrays a strong and confident exterior but is vulnerable and has been hurt in the past. She is loyal to her friends and those she cares about but is wary of Francis and those who promise her things. The more I learnt of her, the more I liked her 
Because I saw him through Nancy’s eyes, it took me longer to warm to Francis but his determination to make Nancy trust him and his characters development meant that I learnt to love him and be routing for him and his dream of seeing his story on stage
Francis grew up in the workhouse and his play is his life story with the aim of bringing attention to the workhouses and the conditions to those in positions of power and influence who may be able to enact change. I didn’t know much about the workhouse before this book and this has really opened my eyes to the harsh reality of what happened to people and even though I only saw a part of it, seeing it through Nancy and Francis’s eyes made it even more real 
Both Nancy and Francis have terrible pasts that still haunt them but they have risen up and become the people who they always could be
This book isn’t easy reading but it did grip my attention and I hope it will yours, as such I would recommend this book to those who enjoy a gritty life story that has the potential and power for pain but also of love and dreams 
AM 🐾 x

Purchase Link:

UK – https://www.amazon.co.uk/Trouble-Leading-Lady-gripping-Victorian-ebook/dp/B08GTT5H2K 

US –  https://www.amazon.com/Trouble-Leading-Lady-gripping-Victorian-ebook/dp/B08GTT5H2K

Author Bio 

Author pic3 - Aug 2018

Rachel lives in a small town near Bath, England. She is the author of over 20 published novels including the Shop Girl series (Aria Fiction) and the Templeton Cove Stories (Harlequin).

In 2019 she signed a new three book contract with Aria Fiction for a Victorian trilogy set in a Bath brothel. The first book, A Widow’s Vow was released in September 2020 followed by book 2 Trouble For The Leading Lady in March 2021 – it is expected that the final instalment will be released in the Autumn 2021.

Rachel is a member of the Romantic Novelists Association and has thousands of social media followers all over the world.

To sign up for her newsletter (a guaranteed giveaway every month!), click here:

https://us12.list-manage.com/subscribe?u=ab0dc0484a3855f2bc769984f&id=bd3173973a

Social Media Links –

Website: https://rachelbrimble.com/

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Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/rachelbrimbleauthor/?hl=en

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Filed under books, Drama, Drama, friendship, History, love, romance

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